Western Armenia Forum
Vous souhaitez réagir à ce message ? Créez un compte en quelques clics ou connectez-vous pour continuer.

Western Armenia Forum

Forum de l'Arménie Occidentale
 
AccueilAccueil  RechercherRechercher  Dernières imagesDernières images  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  ConnexionConnexion  
Le Deal du moment : -14%
Console Sony PS5 Slim Edition Standard Blanc et Noir
Voir le deal
474.99 €

 

 Keeping Armenia Alive in the Capital of Sudan

Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
tseghakron

tseghakron


Nombre de messages : 755
Date d'inscription : 25/09/2007

Keeping Armenia Alive in the Capital of Sudan Empty
MessageSujet: Keeping Armenia Alive in the Capital of Sudan   Keeping Armenia Alive in the Capital of Sudan Icon_minitimeJeu 11 Juin - 10:29

POSTCARD FROM KHARTOUM
Keeping Armenia Alive in the Capital of Sudan
By BETWA SHARMA Tuesday, Jun. 09, 2009
Keeping Armenia Alive in the Capital of Sudan Armenian_0522
Father Gabriel Sargsyan


Betwa Sharma for TIME

"If Armenians are to be great then they have to pray," says Father Gabriel Sargsyan. "As long as there is one Armenian left, there will be a church." Perhaps, but only a handful of the 50 or so Armenians left in Khartoum have turned up for mass — held in the evening, because Sunday is a working day in the capital of predominantly Muslim Sudan. After the service, the small group sits on the porch of the St. Gregory Armenian Church, sipping sugary coffee and remembering the days when the pews used to be full.

Despite the Khartoum government having 'Islamized' the north of the country through the imposition of Shari'a law, there is no sense of religious persecution here at St. Gregory's. Leaders of the Armenian and the neighboring Ethiopian Orthodox churches say they feel safe in Khartoum, and that the persecution of Catholics and Protestants from southern Sudan is a product of the country's north-south power struggle — the small Orthodox Christian communities pose no threat to the predominantly Muslim government. "We respect the law of the land and stay out of trouble," says Eyasu Tadele, an official of Khartoum's Ethiopian Orthodox Church. (See pictures of Darfur.)

The Ethiopian Church, in fact, fares somewhat better than its Armenian neighbor, attracting a flood of worshippers every Sunday. That may be a product of shifting patterns of immigration. Many Armenians came to Sudan as refugees from the mass murder in Turkey that began in 1915, while a second wave of immigrants arrived in the 1950s, seeking opportunities in the newly independent country. St. Gregory's opened its doors in 1957, and at its peak, the congregation was 2,000 strong. But many have since left in search of opportunity in Europe and North America, while the Ethiopian expatriate community in Sudan has steadily grown. "First they were coming because of the political crisis and now because of economic reasons," says Tadele.

As much as he appreciates the company of his Christian neighbors, Father Gabriel is concerned that several Armenians have married Ethiopian Christians and Copts, producing children who are taught Arabic or Amharic rather than Armenian. "When one person stops speaking Armenian, our Diaspora is lost," he says. That's why he's working hard to resuscitate the old church school to teach the Armenian language, although with wealthier members of the community having emigrated, he struggles to find the necessary funds. More families are contemplating leaving for fear of a new season of instability as fallout from the international arrest warrant accusing President Omar al-Bashir of war crimes in Darfur. Only a few children remain at the school, but Father Gabriel would be happy to teach even just one student. "Armenia lives through our language," he says.

One Sudanese Armenian who claims he will never leave is Jeriar Homer Charles Bozadjian, whose family history in Sudan dates back 100 years. Bozadjian runs a restaurant called Big Bite in Khartoum. "I have never seen Armenia," he says. "Sudan is my home."

Despite the imposition of Shari'a law, "This is not like Saudi Arabia," says Wafaa Babikier, who studies Management at Ahfad University for Women in Omdurman city. "Girls have the freedom to do everything." Not everyone answers the call to prayer; women drive cars and attend co-ed universities; and they outnumber men in many offices and educational institutions. Others, like Alfred Taban, editor of the Khartoum Monitor, demur, warning that behind the facade of tolerance is a more hard-core Islamist outlook. "A foreigner would not notice," he says. Taban claims to have been whipped for drinking alcohol in a traditional toast at the birth of a relative's son.

But Bozadjian aggressively defends his homeland's plurality. "Sudan is a unique country," he says. "Muslims helped to build this church." But others note that many Armenians left Sudan after their properties were confiscated under the radical regime of President Jaafar Nimeiri during the 1970s. Elizabeth Jinjinian, a 70-year-old businesswoman, recalls how the land of the Armenian club was taken away when the community began to shrink, "We used to have many balls, picnics and parties."

Often tempted to join her sons in London or New York, Jinjinian has stayed on to run her small cosmetics business, which has survived years of war and sanctions. "Exports and imports dried up," she says. "We had to get goods into the country in suitcases."

Despite the resilience of many of the community's veterans, the efforts of Father Gabriel to sustain his culture in this corner of the Armenian Diaspora face mounting odds. Indeed, the priest himself is slated to leave soon, because the community no longer has the funds to support him. He hopes someone in the community will step forward to run his school. "If you have a school, your nation is going on," he says.

The collective memory of the horrors of 1915 may be the most powerful factor in sustaining the community's identity. On the dusty church verandah, Jinjinian animatedly narrates the tale of her mother's escape from Turkey after her grandparents were killed. "She was at the dressmakers so she was saved." Her tale is well known to the congregants, but everyone listens respectfully as a warm breeze ushers in another hot summer.
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1903175,00.html
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://njdeh.free.fr
tseghakron

tseghakron


Nombre de messages : 755
Date d'inscription : 25/09/2007

Keeping Armenia Alive in the Capital of Sudan Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Keeping Armenia Alive in the Capital of Sudan   Keeping Armenia Alive in the Capital of Sudan Icon_minitimeJeu 11 Juin - 10:33

Maintenir en vie l'Arménie dans la Capitale du Soudan
Par BETWA SHARMA Tuesday, le 09 juin 2009

"Si les Arméniens doivent être grands alors qu'ils doivent prier," dit le Père Gabriel Sargsyan. "Aussi longtemps qu'il y a un Arménien quitté, il y aura une église." Peut-être, mais seulement une poignée que les environ 50 Arméniens quittés à Khartoum ont augmentée pour la masse — tenu le soir, parce que dimanche est un jour ouvrable dans la capitale du Soudan principalement musulman. Après le service, le petit groupe s'assoit sur le porche de l'Église de rue Gregory Armenian, en buvant du café sucré à petits coups et en se souvenant des jours où les bancs d'église avaient l'habitude d'être pleins.

En dépit du gouvernement de Khartoum ayant islamizé le nord du pays au cours de l'imposition de loi Shari'a, il n'y a aucun sens de persécution religieuse ici à la rue Gregory. Les chefs de l'Arménien et des églises Orthodoxes éthiopiennes voisines disent qu'ils se sentent sûrs à Khartoum et que la persécution de catholiques et de Protestants du Soudan du sud est un produit du pays au nord-sud la lutte pour le pouvoir — les petites communautés d'Orthodoxe Christian ne posent aucune menace au gouvernement principalement musulman. "Nous respectons la loi de la terre et du séjour du problème," dit Eyasu Tadele, un fonctionnaire de l'Église Orthodoxe éthiopienne de Khartoum. (Voir des dessins de Darfur.)
L'Église éthiopienne, en fait, les prix un peu mieux que son voisin arménien, en attirant une inondation d'adorateurs tous les dimanches. Cela peut être un produit de déplacer des dessins d'immigration. Beaucoup d'Arméniens sont venus au Soudan comme les réfugiés du meurtre de masse en Turquie qui a commencé en 1915, pendant qu'une deuxième vague d'immigrants est arrivée au cours des années 1950, en cherchant des occasions dans le pays nouvellement indépendant. La rue Gregory ouverte ses portes en 1957 et à son pic, la congrégation était 2 000 forte. Mais beaucoup sont depuis partis à la recherche de l'occasion en Europe et Amérique du Nord, pendant que la communauté d'expatrié éthiopienne au Soudan a grandi progressivement. "D'abord ils venaient à cause de la crise politique et maintenant à cause des raisons économiques," dit Tadele.
Autant qu'il apprécie la compagnie de ses voisins chrétiens, le Père Gabriel est inquiété que plusieurs Arméniens se soient mariés avec les chrétiens éthiopiens et les Coptes, en produisant des enfants à qui on enseigne l'arabe ou l'amharique plutôt que l'arménien. "Quand une personne arrête de parler arménien, notre Diaspora est perdue," dit-il. C'est pour cela qu'il travaille dur pour réanimer la vieille école d'église pour enseigner la langue arménienne, bien qu'avec les membres plus riches de la communauté ayant émigrée, il se débatte pour trouver les fonds nécessaires. Plus de familles envisagent de partir de peur d'une nouvelle saison d'instabilité comme les retombées radioactives du mandat d'arrêt international accusant Président Omar al-Bashir des crimes de guerre dans Darfur. Seulement quelques enfants restent à l'école, mais le Père Gabriel serait heureux d'enseigner même juste à un étudiant. "L'Arménie survit notre langue," dit-il.
Un Arménien soudanais qui réclame qu'il ne partira jamais est Jeriar Homer Charles Bozadjian, dont l'histoire de famille au Soudan date 100 ans. Bozadjian dirige un restaurant appelé le Grand Morceau à Khartoum. "Je n'ai jamais vu l'Arménie," dit-il. "Le Soudan est ma maison."
En dépit de l'imposition de loi Shari'a, "Cela ne ressemble pas à l'Arabie Saoudite," dit Wafaa Babikier, qui étudie la Direction à l'université Ahfad pour les Femmes dans la ville Omdurman. "Les filles ont la liberté de faire tout." Pas chacun répond à l'appel à la prière; les femmes conduisent des voitures et assistent aux universités d'étudiante; et ils emportent en nombre sur les hommes dans beaucoup de bureaux et institutions éducatives. D'autres, comme Alfred Taban, le rédacteur du Moniteur de Khartoum, l'objection, en avertissant qui derrière la façade de tolérance est une perspective Islamiste plus hardcore. "Un étranger ne remarquerait pas," dit-il. Taban prétend avoir été fouetté pour boire de l'alcool dans un toast traditionnel à la naissance du fils d'un parent.
Mais Bozadjian défend agressivement la pluralité de sa patrie. "Le Soudan est un pays unique," dit-il. "Les musulmans ont aidé à construire cette église." Mais d'autres notent que beaucoup d'Arméniens ont quitté le Soudan après que leurs propriétés ont été confisquées sous le régime radical de Président Jaafar Nimeiri pendant les années 1970. Elizabeth Jinjinian, une femme d'affaires de 70 ans, se souvient comment la terre du club arménien a été emportée quand la communauté a commencé à rétrécir, "Nous avions l'habitude d'avoir beaucoup de boules, pique-niques et partis."
Souvent tenté de rejoindre ses fils à Londres ou à New York, Jinjinian est resté pour diriger son petit commerce de cosmétique, qui a survécu aux années de guerre et de sanctions. "Les exportations et les importations se sont asséchées," dit-elle. "Nous devions recevoir des marchandises dans le pays dans les valises."
En dépit de la résilience de beaucoup de vétérans de la communauté, les efforts de Père Gabriel de soutenir sa culture à ce coin de la cote de montant de visage de Diaspora arménienne. Effectivement, le prêtre lui-même est couvert d'ardoises pour partir bientôt, parce que la communauté n'a plus les fonds pour le soutenir. Il espère que quelqu'un dans la communauté va le pas en avant pour diriger son école. "Si vous avez une école, votre nation continue," dit-il.
La mémoire collective des horreurs de 1915 peut être le facteur le plus puissant dans le soutien de l'identité de la communauté. Sur la véranda d'église poussiéreuse, Jinjinian animatedly raconte l'histoire de la fuite de sa mère de la Turquie après que ses grand-pères ont été tués. "Elle était aux couturiers donc elle a été sauvée." Son histoire est bien connue du congregants, mais chacun écoute respectueusement comme une brise chaude introduit un autre été chaud.
Source: TIME
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1903175,00.html
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://njdeh.free.fr
tseghakron

tseghakron


Nombre de messages : 755
Date d'inscription : 25/09/2007

Keeping Armenia Alive in the Capital of Sudan Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Keeping Armenia Alive in the Capital of Sudan   Keeping Armenia Alive in the Capital of Sudan Icon_minitimeJeu 11 Juin - 10:44

Ou voir la traduction par le Google

http://translate.google.com/translate?js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.time.com%2Ftime%2Fworld%2Farticle%2F0%2C8599%2C1903175%2C00.html&sl=en&tl=fr&history_state0=
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://njdeh.free.fr
Contenu sponsorisé





Keeping Armenia Alive in the Capital of Sudan Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Keeping Armenia Alive in the Capital of Sudan   Keeping Armenia Alive in the Capital of Sudan Icon_minitime

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Keeping Armenia Alive in the Capital of Sudan
Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» WESTERN ARMENIA NEWS
» WESTERN ARMENIA TV
» DVD WESTERN ARMENIA LOST MOTHERLAND
» In the homeland of the Armenians, in Armenia.
» REGNUM WESTERN ARMENIA

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Western Armenia Forum :: ACTUALITES :: Arménie Occidentale-
Sauter vers: