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 KEGHI (GEGHI)

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Karin
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astrig




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MessageSujet: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeMar 6 Mai - 16:10

http://www.armeniandiaspora.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-64682.html

Keghi: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

Madatian Greg
10-07-2006, 06:40 AM
Keghi: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

By Isabel Kaprielian-Churchill
The Armenian Weekly www.armenianweekly.com
September 30, 2006


Ever since I was a child, I had heard about Garin from my mother: the Russian cannons bombarding in the distance; my grandfather pounding his brass and copper vessels; my pious grandmother stirring the congregation of Sourp Astvatsatsin with her ethereal voice. But it was Keghi that had fired my imagination: my father mesmerizing us with stories of village life, slapping his knee, clapping his hands and triumphantly exclaiming, "Hassoin hashiva makrivav," as he described how he and his friends chased off the Kurdish bandit Haso and his gang of cut-throat sheep thieves. My father told us about the fragility of life in Keghi at the hands of outlaws, tribal warlords and corrupt government officials, and the valiant efforts of Armenian villagers to defend their families and their properties. And always, the life-giving mountains figured in his stories: the waters gushing from the mountainsides in spring and the high verdant pastures offering sustenance to the villagers' sheep in summer.

I had long hoped to visit these places, to throw a kiss to the mountains that had formed so much of my childhood lore, and to shed a tear in the Kyle River as its waters rushed to replenish the great Euphrates. So in 2004, my husband and I embarked on a pilgrimage to Garin, my mother's birthplace and to Jerman village in Keghi, my father's birthplace. Luckily they are not far apart, as Keghi is a county in the Garin province.

We traveled to Garin first and found it a relatively modern industrial city with paved roads, automobiles, public transit, busy streets, billboard signs, apartment dwellings, factories, pollution-all the hustle and bustle of modern urban life.

By contrast, Keghi was still shambling along in the early 20th century. Here, time had all but stood still since my father had left his beloved mountains for Canada in 1912 as a migrant worker to earn money to improve his family's properties in Jerman.

Today, Keghi is still a rural place, strewn with many villages and one small-very small-town, the county capital of Keghi-Kasaba (Kgi). The principal economic base of the region is still agriculture-primitive agriculture at that. Peasants still live in stone and mud-brick hovels, farm small plots of land, and care for their goats. As in the days of the Armenians, there is some business activity in a few of the bigger villages: small coffee shops, little stores selling food, tobacco, clothing and hardware supplies, and a few shoemakers, barbers, lawyers, doctors, and some schools. But we saw no major industry, no tractors or harvesters. And everywhere we went, our van caused a big commotion-a novelty among the local inhabitants.

We also observed anachronisms in this glorious Shangri-la. A massive dam spanning the Kyle or Wolf River (now the Peri Su) that cuts through Keghi has brought a stroke of modernity to this slow-moving part of the world. Here, a man harvested his grain with a scythe, then stopped to telephone his son on his cell phone. There, women baked bread in a tonir, dug into the open earth, next to a house with an indoor toilet, running water and a TV. People drove automobiles and trucks on roads that were still mostly dirt and gravel, still dangerous and often impassable with potholes and bumps at every twist and turn. The area seemed in transition-somewhat disjointed-perhaps struggling to retain its old ways and customs, and stepping ever so carefully into the modern era. A place, I thought, that was suspicious of innovation and change.

Since my teenage years, I have been proud of my mountain stock; and like my ancestors, I have valued my independence. As if to prove a point, I used to sing the Dalvorig song, to my father's unmistakable delight and my mother's feigned disapproval. When I finally saw the awesome mountains of Keghi, a supernatural force seemed to take hold of me. My spirits soared to the summits. I wanted to embrace the mountains.

Since ancient times, an aura of sanctity has hung over the mountain of Sour Luis ("St. Light"). When I saw the mountain, etched against a cloudless blue sky, I felt that its rocks were part of me and that I was part of the mountain. As if aware of my turbulent emotions, the mountain thundered in response: "Come to me and I will shelter you and give you peace. Use my stones to rebuild your churches and monasteries in my lofty heights and I will defend them against your enemies. As steadfast as I stand here, so steadfast will be your resistance to tyranny and murder."

For centuries, the mountains of Keghi protected the Armenians: the Bingol Mountains to the east, the Der Sim to the West, and the Sheitan mountains to the north. The Sheitans hid the villages from the lame but wily destroyer, Ta­mer­lane (Lengtemur), and for that reason, the villages of Jerman, Melikan, Shen, Amarij and Arins are known as andress, or unseen. But Tamer­lane ravaged and pillaged the rest of Keghi, looting, burning, killing. The Persian Shah Abbas II also wreaked his vengeance on the area. Villagers fled to the Der Sim Mountains. Here they remained until reason and calm ruled the land once again. Then they descended to the valley below and reconstructed their villages and repaired their churches.

According to Keghi legend, Der Sim was named after the Armenian priest Der Simon. The Kurds of Der Sim, so the story goes, invited two Armenian builders to construct houses for them. During their work, the Armenians discovered a gravestone marked "Der Simon, Vartabed." Immediately the Armenians asked the Kurds for the precious stone, saying it should be placed in the St. Kevork church in the village of Hertif. The Kurds, however, refused, on the grounds that in times past, they too were Armenians and had escaped to the mountains during the Arab invasions. Der Simon, they emphasized, had been loved by all the inhabitants.

The language of the Der Simtsis was a mixture of Armenian and Kurdish, and their religion combined Christianity and Islam. During the Genocide, these same mountain clans helped Armenians find refuge in the Der Sim Mountains, safe from Turkish rampage.

As we drove along the main Keghi road, I gazed at the Peri Su and marveled at its beauty. All the while, another vision kept haunting me-the same river almost 100 years ago. Was it here that my father's first wife, running away from a Kurdish pursuer, panic-stricken, threw her young self into the raging water? Was it there that my aunt's mother, bereft at the murder of her husband and brother, tried to drown herself and her four young children? Their screams and those of their terrified people surely rose up to the mountain tops and the mountains, outraged, and echoed their cries over and over and over again. It is eerie how stories from our past lurch forth, and how, unsummoned, they jostle to the front of our forehead and stand firmly next to our own djagadakeer [destiny].

Along our way, we visited many villages. We were hospitably received by the Kurds who now dominate the region. They offered us tan and madzoon, tea, bread, and even Keghetsi beorag. In village after village, we saw ruined churches and monasteries. Some had been converted to mosques; others, partially standing, served as stables or garbage dumps. Still others were totally laid waste, their stones littered about as if being reclaimed by the mountains.

Some stones were reused for other buildings. Where the lovely St. Giragos monastery once stood, we found only rubble, overgrown with weeds. The abbey had been pillaged in the 1890s and much of its lands confiscated. The year 1915 saw the completion of the plunder. As I looked at the stones of the nearby house, I noticed one with a number of crosses carved in it by pilgrims. How much faith and devotion had gone into that stone! How many sharagans and prayers it had heard! How much joy and pain, how much laughter and tears it had witnessed over the centuries! I comforted myself by saying that at least this stone had not been shattered by Turkish artillery nor defaced by a wild, angry mob. At least it still remained as evidence of my father's world. So intensely was I staring at the stone that the little crosses seemed to turn into tears. The stone was weeping. "I am still here," it sobbed, "All alone, forsaken. When will you return to restore me to my rightful place in your sanctuary?" With tears welling, I said a little prayer and slipped away carrying with me the spirit of the stone.

Keghi seemed peaceful enough. Men farmed, goat­herds tended their flock, wo­men sewed their vermags [blankets], washed their laundry in the mountain springs. All seemed idyllic in this radiant valley. All appeared normal-normal as in the past, for if we stripped away the layers we would find a region still marked by violence, insecurity and fear. Here, the military is every­where, kee­ping constant vigilance on travelers and on the Kurdish population. Were Kurdish insurgents roaming the mountains, carrying on their clandestine struggle for autonomy? Did the peasants own the land they so assiduously tilled or were they sharecroppers exploited by large absentee landlords? What was the relationship between these rural settlers and their husbands and fathers working in western European cities? Would the Turkish government deport these villagers as it had done with the Der Simtsis, or destroy them as it had tried to do with the Armenians?

As we waved goodbye to the children of Jerman, renamed Yedisu, who had gathered to see us off, devouring the chocolates and clutching the little toys we had given them, I felt neither disheartened nor depressed. I was thinking only of history. I recalled the many old churches, abbeys, castles and medieval towns I had visited in Europe, and thought how wonderful it was that 10th and 11th century structures were still standing. But if we read their history, every single one of them has been destroyed or decayed and rebuilt again and again. Caen in Normandy, for example, the seat of William the Conqueror, suffered during the Hundred Years War and again during the wars of religion, when the Huguenots went so far as to scatter William's old bones to the winds. The city was again ravaged during the French Revolution and yet again during World War II when Allied bombs leveled 85 percent of the city. Each time, Caen has been resurrected and today it stands resplendent, worthy of the powerful conqueror and his prestigious queen.

I thought of how the Republic of Armenia is conserving and renovating a precious heritage. And I thought of the current political and religious conditions that thwart all efforts at restoration and preservation in our ancient homeland in present-day Turkey. But, if anything, history reveals, time and time again, that regimes change, priorities change, empires rise and fall.

How many times have Armenians been driven from their homeland and how many times have they returned? How many times have they reconstructed their castles and their fortresses, restored their churches and monasteries and made them even more beautiful than before? Some day, the stones will find their rightful place in St. Giragos, Aghtamar and Ani. Once again the villages and towns will repossess their Armenian names. Once again Sourp Luis will stand as the sacred symbol of Keghi. And once again the mountains will yield their stones to build our sanctuaries, which will rise like peaks to the heavens, extensions of the mountains themselves.


Dernière édition par astrig le Sam 27 Juin - 14:09, édité 2 fois
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astrig




Nombre de messages : 1053
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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeJeu 8 Mai - 15:55

Je voudrais retourner et m'installer à Keghi. flower sunny Et je vais manger beaucoup de Keghetsi beorag. Wink
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astrig




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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeJeu 8 Mai - 16:13

http://www.arslanmb.org/arslanian/KeghiImmigrants.html
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astrig




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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeJeu 8 Mai - 16:48

http://cjtm.icaap.org/content/18/v18art7.html

Canadian Journal for Traditional Music (1990) In Search of Nine Keghi Songs

Hasmig Injejkian

The 1982-83 issue of Polyphony published by the Multicultural History Society of Ontario (MHS) was dedicated to the early Armenian settlers in Ontario. My own contribution, "The Musical Repertory of Early Armenian Settlers," 1 was one of a number of articles that discussed the unwritten history of Armenians in Canada.

As part of my research I conducted a field trip to interview and tape six members of the community. The tape material with 87 songs, along with the Robert Melkom collection from MHS archives, a 1937 Yearbook, published in Detroit by the Keghi Patriotic Society, and some 78 rpm phonograph records by community members were primary source material. The article gave an overview of the musical tradition of Armenian settlers in Canada with a in-depth analysis of nine Keghi folk songs and dance tunes.

Because of lack of time and financing, my research was not conclusive. The informants were limited to six, and Canadian-born Keghetzis were not included. Among various research topic possibilities the article suggested, the most vital was the question of culture retention or acculturation.

Expeditions should be undertaken to understand how the immigrating generation retained their culture and the causes of acculturation in the next generation. Children of the original informants, other Keghetzis, and their children should be interviewed.

No study except my own has been undertaken concerning the musical heritage of the emigrating generation. Such a project is of utmost importance, since this repertory is the only musical legacy that the early settlers carried with them, and the older Keghi musical culture has been extirpated.

During a field trip (October 25-27, 1987) to St. Catharines and Cambridge, Ontario, I interviewed fourteen Keghetzis; six were born in the "old country" between 1903-12, five in St. Catharines and Brantford, between 1912 and 1918, and the remaining three in St. Catharines and Cambridge in the 1930s and 1940s. Having a fair representation of both immigrant and Canadian Keghetzis born before and after World War I helps to answer some of the questions raised in my project.

Although the primary aim was to collect variants of the nine Keghi songs listed in my article, I took the opportunity to learn more about the cultural and social life of Keghetzis both in the old country and Canada and used a questionnaire to maintain the necessary uniformity during the interviews. The six immigrant informants were asked about life in the old country, customs, beliefs, family life, social structure, festivities, the Turkish deportations, the massacres, and circumstances concerning their move to Canada. Their most vivid accounts centered on the deportations, the genocide, and orphanage experiences. Only one informant gave a full description of her house and traditional family life; others were able to recall some activities related to various festivities.

As for their early years in Canada, questions focused on social and economic adjustments, schooling and work experiences, community life, and the upbringing of children. They all underlined similar economic and social hardships, but pointed out that they had found solace in each other's company, gathering around a church, a patriotic society, a political party, or a school, and serving as teachers, church deacons, charity organizers, or volunteer workers.

Despite their involvement in Armenian community life, their children gradually succumbed to the Canadian mainstream.
Both the first and second group of Canadian-born informan s were asked about the heritage transmitted by their parents their childhood experiences, their attendance at Armenian evening schools, social and family life, and the upbringing of their children. It seems that the first generation absorbed their parents' heritage the most, although some confessed that if they had known of its value, they would have been more attentive; answers from the second generation Canadian-born informants varied from total ignorance to resentment. Information gathered was verified against published memoirs of the old country? Despite inquiries I could not obtain samples of early records. There were, however, some cassette recordings of contemporary bands whose repertory and style was an amalgam of Middle Eastern song and dance medleys, performed on synthesized instruments.

Most informants were familiar with four of the nine melodies listed in my article. One sang a slightly different version of one song-dance which will be presented in this paper for comparison.I also taped two songs for the first time, which will be additions to Keghi song repertory. Two other songs, taped during my previous expedition, are included in this paper to give a more cohesive picture of the musical culture.

I discuss the various traditions still remembered by my informants to determine whether the nine Keghi songs are still part of their cultural heritage, how these songs were transmitted to them, and how did social, economic, and political events affect the retention or loss of their culture.

Historical Background

Keghi (Khorzen, Geghi),3 the westernmost district of Historic Armenia (today it is in Turkey),4 is a mountainous region 3,200 feet above sea level. Over 300 villages are spread over 3,000 square miles surrounded by mountains and fertile valleys, rivers and lakes, mineral springs, and various natural resources. 5A 1908 report estimated the population at 60,000, of whom 50 per cent were Armenians; the Kurdish nomadic tribes formed the second major group; only five to ten thousand were Turkish.' Although Keghi was "at times a centre of learning and sciences," 7only near the end of the nineteenth century did the area get modern schools.8 The fast-spreading chain of educational institutions was the result of a national awakening, initiated by Armenian intellectuals and enhanced by the work of American missionaries. 9 Already in the 1850s missionary work was felt throughout the teachings of one Melkon Djantemirian. 10 Protestantism made its way in almost every village, and relatively well-off Protestant communities were formed. The youth were encouraged to migrate to America to further their education or to find better employment.In return these young people, through their educational societies, financed new schools in the old country. Soon every village had a school.11 In 1915 the deportations and genocide executed by the Turkish Government brought this social, economic, and educational rebirth to an abrupt stop. The youth who had emigrated with plans to return home had no news from family and relatives and were stranded for years. The brutal reality, gradually revealed after 1918, of having lost all family and homeland, forced these Armenians to settle in Canada and the United States. With the creation of an independent Armenia (1918-1920), some cherished the idea of returning "Home" but "the Lauzanne Treaty (1923) ended all hopes of repatriation."12 Hence, these communities began to reorganize their churches, founded patriotic and charitable associations, conducted evening or Saturday Armenian language schools, and reformed their political parties, which "took on the added functions of representing all the other aspects of community life"13

In the southern Ontario towns of St. Catharines, Brantford, and Hamilton, most Armenian settlers were Keghetzis, with a few from the Moush and Van districts. '4As a result these towns resembled a transplanted Keghi with all its villages. 15<

The Keghi Patriotic Society formed in 1917 in Detroit with 225 members had 40 from St. Catherines. Regardless of political adherence, all Keghetzis gathered around their society, whose prime aim was to help the destitute survivors and orphans. After an inactive period, the Society reorganized in 1934 with the aim of creating a New Keghi in Soviet Armenia.16 Its twenty-eight branches carried on charitable, social, and educational tasks in both North America and the Middle East. Seven of these branches were in southern Ontario.17

Until 1934 Armenian communities of Apostolic denomination gathered around the Mother Church. The events that unfolded in the early 30s culminating in the assassination of Archbishop L. Tourian, the Prelate of the Armenian Diocese of the Eastern United States, in 1933, led to a severe split in Armenian communities throughout the States and Canada. 18 The bitterness, mostly due to misunderstandings, persists among the members of this first generation. The split not only demoralized them but estranged them from one another. Consequently, their children, affected by these affairs, and not having the background of their fathers, chose to dissociate themselves from Armenian life.

Assimilation, whether partial or total, is inevitable for a small group living within a larger society. Some of the social and political factors, the work of the American missionaries and the Armenian intellectuals, the deportation, massacre, and upheavals of the earlyyears of settlement, left their mark on Armenian, communities in North America. These factors could not have caused total assimilation if family and community life and schooling had given their people a secure grip on their culture.

Culture does not include only language, but also customs, traditions, festive days, songs and dances, and cuisine. Of these, cuisine is the only item with which second-generation Armeniansidentify.
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astrig




Nombre de messages : 1053
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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeJeu 8 Mai - 16:53

http://209.85.135.104/search?q=cache:IpfUqmFlsnMJ:cjtm.icaap.org/content/18/v18art1.html+Keghi&hl=fr&ct=clnk&cd=26&gl=fr

Hasmig Injejikian trace l'histoire des immigrants arméniens de la region de Keghi qui sont venus s'installer dans le sud de l'Ontario. Elle examine une collection de neuf chansons et melodies et discute la survivance de la culture arménienne, qu'eIIe constate toujours chez la premiere génération née au Canada, mais qu'elle trouve presque absente chez la deuxième.

Resumé: Pauline Greenhill presente un compte rendu de l'étude de Shelly Posen portant sur la chanson populaire de Ia vallée de l'Outouais, "The Chapeau Boys." Dans son étude, Posen trace I'origine de la chanson et discute ses maintes variantes, pour démontrer comment elle se sert de miroir culturel de Ia region.
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astrig




Nombre de messages : 1053
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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeJeu 8 Mai - 16:55

http://www.amazon.fr/Survivors-Oral-History-Armenian-Genocide/dp/0520219562
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astrig




Nombre de messages : 1053
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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeJeu 8 Mai - 16:59

http://209.85.135.104/search?q=cache:I5tjIWFsrc8J:www.armeniapedia.org/index.php%3Ftitle%3DArmenians_in_Ontario_and_Quebec+Keghi&hl=fr&ct=clnk&cd=30&gl=fr

Armenians in Ontario and Quebec
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By Hrag Vartanian (AGBU Magazine, July 2000)

The earliest history of Armenians in Canada is mostly an unknown chapter. While records reveal the first Armenian settler, Garabed Nergararian, arrived in Ontario during the 1880's and lived in the small fishing village of Port Hope, it was not until decades later that any substantial Armenian immigration to Canada began.

In fact, few Armenians traveled to Canada during the nineteenth century and even fewer remained. Some Armenians, led by the dream of coming to America, passed through Canada hoping to avoid the mandatory U.S. health examinations. Official records show that between 1899 and 1917, 1,577 Armenians entered the

United States through the Canadian land border. Others arrived in Canada from the Ottoman Empire and Russia and a small number relocated from various regions of the U.S.

The few that settled or studied in Canada in the early years included individuals like Armenag Haigazian and Paul Courian, both Protestant Armenians probably encouraged to make the journey by missionaries in the Ottoman Empire. Courian arrived from Constantinople and opened Toronto's first oriental carpet store in the late nineteenth century. Haigazian (for whom Haigazian University in Beirut is named) enrolled at the University of Toronto in 1898 to study music after completing his Ph.D. at Yale Theological Seminary. He later returned to Anatolia and died in the Genocide.

Early Canadian oral history reveals that a member of the Cockshutt family, owners of the Cockshutt Plow Co. in Brantford, Ontario, went to Constantinople in the 1880?s and recruited ten Armenian workers, originally from Keghi in the province of Erzerum. Soon, other Armenians began arriving in the southern Ontario industrial towns of Hamilton, Brantford and St. Catharines in search of employment. Dr. Isabel Kaprielian calls this early period of Armenian immigration to Canada, the "Sojourner" period which continued until the Genocide. Most of these pioneers arrived in the country hoping to return to their native villages withtheir hard-earned savings. Little distinguished the small and predominantly male communities from other Armenian settlements, except for the fact that 80% were from Keghi.
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astrig




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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeJeu 8 Mai - 17:08

http://209.85.129.104/search?q=cache:H2hE7C14c4YJ:www.hunchak.org.au/aboutus/lestweforget_setrak_shahen.html+Keghi&hl=fr&ct=clnk&cd=38&gl=fr


Setrak Shahen
(1888 - 1975)

Born in Keghi in 1888.

Shahen had, for two years, attended the local Protestant school upon the insistence of his father, who was then in America for work.

Shahen remembers that "there wasn't any Armenian household that did not have at least one member of the family working in America in those days". To continue his education, he was later sent to 'Yeprad' College, the American missionary school in Kharpet, its students numbered 1300 at that time. After 9 year years at 'Yeprad' College, he was expelled from the school for being a "revolutionary Hunchakian" with less than a year left to his graduation. Shahen thereafter, traveled extensively throughout Turkish Armenia as a teacher and a party organizer and activist. His duties had taken him to Arapgir, Malatia, Dikranagerd, Daron, Sasoon, Palou, and back to his home Keghi.

He left Keghi in 1913 for America only to return to the Caucasus from 1915-16 as a volunteer fighter (Gamavor).

In 1919 Setrak Shahen returned to Constantinople, Smyrna and Cilicia as a party activist; he was arrested and exiled by the French following the aborted declaration of the independence of Cilicia. Shahen fought the Turks until he escaped the Kemalist siege of Smyrna in 1922. Returned to America and assumed various responsibilities as an active Hunchakian, including the editorship of "Eridassard Hayastan", the party organ in New York in the 1940's. He also published two of his most revolutionary plays, "Sassoonk" and "Giliglio Zakhoghanke" (Cilicia's Failure). Setrak Shahen's other plays include "Talaati Angoome" (The Fall of Talaat), "Zeitoon", "Paramaz yev Kessan Gakhaghannere" (Paramaz and the Twenty Gallows), "Gargaroon Gamarner" (Arches of Triumph, about S. Mourad Of Sepastia, a Hunchak fedayee), and "Mazak Pitcha" (about the battle of Sartarabad). "His style of writing is simple, pleasant and understandable to the common people" according to his long time collegue Yeghia Sirvard, "Shahen is the most popular and liked personality of our community" (New York).

In the 60's and 70's Shahen was undoubtedly the most respected and well known Hunchak on the West Coast, "Talaati Angoome" has been produced in Los Angeles many times. Setrak Shahen's writings have been positive distractions to the post-Genocide Hunchak youth, his plays have been sources of inspiration for the free spirited and revolutionary minded Armenians, While the people couldn't, his characters aspire to achieve the highest ideals of the Armenian people. The plays "Zeitoon" and "Sassoonk" contain information that are the result of his research based on the Hunchak party literature of the time and eyewitness accounts. Shahen has Immortalized Hunchak heroes and events of legendary magnitude (Paramaz, Aghasi, Mourad and Kaay). His contribution to the movement is in the dramatization of its revolutionary history, through a masterful combination of facts, playwriting and story telling.

Setrak Shahen died in Los Angeles in 1975, short of his 92nd birthday. He had said that:

"Neither Sartarabad, nor modern Armenia would have come about without the revolutionary ideals of the Hunchak party that preceded them".

Setrak Shahen....a proud Hunchak....and a great Armenian.
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astrig




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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeVen 9 Mai - 12:32

Maintenant je comprends le premier fils de notre famille mon grand frère pourquoi on l'a appellé Shahen. Idea Lui aussi il est né à Keghi, d'ailleurs il lui ressemble beaucoup... I love you
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mafilou




Nombre de messages : 34
Age : 108
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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeMar 8 Juil - 5:49

Salut
Je n'ose pas de mettre le texte (en dadjgueren -certains ne comprendra pas le sens de rechercher que je mène).
Voici le lien d'un dossier sur Kigi (Keghi, Kughi ... comme vous le voudrez).
Arrow http://team-aow.discuforum.info/portal.php?pid=27
Smile
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astrig




Nombre de messages : 1053
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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeMar 8 Juil - 18:58

Merci Mafilou biensûr que tu a bien fait Wink , jallais mettre le lien des travaux de Palutzi. Tu a fait avant moi... flower

Ces infos qui notre ami a mis sur Keghi elles viennent de livre de Kevorkian j'en ai en français. Un moment je vais les mettre en français aussi. Par contre avec tout mon respect pour l'auteur en tant qu'une Keghetsi je vais dire bien que ces infos sont justes, elles sont incompletes. Exp. il n'y a pas tous les villages arméniens de Keghi, le nombre de la population arméniennes de Keghi et sur l'assasinat de certain notables de Keghi et les directions de déportations de la poulation arménienne aussi. Mais ce n'est pas grave ce que il a fait déjà c'est très bien il faut que nous tous ensemble nous complétons ces infos. J'ai possede qques infos sur Keghi qui n'ont pas été publiées jusqu'à présent je vais le transmettre les chercheurs ou mettre sur en ligne bientôt.


Dernière édition par astrig le Mar 8 Juil - 19:41, édité 3 fois
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astrig




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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeMar 8 Juil - 18:59

Je mets un lien qui Palutzi a mis pour un village de Keghi.

http://www.hergep.com/
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astrig




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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeMar 8 Juil - 19:21

Les turcs sont passés là. Tout est ruine et deuil. Victor Hugo

Une eglise de Keghi qui est "survecue".

http://team-aow.discuforum.info/t1171-Kigi-Surp-Giragos-Kilisesi.htm
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astrig




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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeMar 8 Juil - 19:26

Kéghouhie = Beauté

Kéghétzig = Belle et jolie

Je pense que nom de notre ville Keghi ça vient de Kéghouhie car prononcation de ce dernier a du devenir plus simple.

Et de plus Keghi est vraiment très beau malgrè tout ce qui elle a du subir.
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Van




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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeMer 9 Juil - 16:24

Khegham un prenom arménien
Kheghuhi ça signifie une belle fille

an pronociation arménenien orientale c'est gegham geghui an arménien occidentale c'est Qegham Qeghuhi.

Gegham est une des fils ou petit fils de Hayk
Le nom de lak sevan est Gueghama tsov les montagne pres de Lac est Gueghamalerner. Par contre j'aimerai comprendre
la terminaison AM dans le prenom Gegham et Aram et dans d'aautre prenom je n'arrive pas.
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astrig




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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeJeu 10 Juil - 15:12

MAGNIFIQUE! I love you yeghpair, tu sais ma grande soeur n'arretait pas dire que le nom de Keghi ça vient d'un prénom d'une fille arménienne très belle.

Elle a appris ça de mon père. Il lui a raconté une histoire sur ce sujet... Lors d'invasion des Arabes pour islamiser notre region, elle a pu imposé plusieurs conditions en faveur des Arméniens contre les Arabes. Et à partir de cette époque qu'on a commencé appeler notre région Keghi, selon les dires de mon père (une petite précision mon père quand parle de son Keghi il dit Geghi)... sunny flower


Dernière édition par astrig le Ven 11 Juil - 0:24, édité 2 fois
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mafilou




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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeJeu 10 Juil - 23:20

astrig a écrit:
...il faut que nous tous ensemble nous complétons ces infos. J'ai possede qques infos sur Keghi qui n'ont pas été publiées jusqu'à présent je vais le transmettre les chercheurs ou mettre sur en ligne bientôt.
S'il te plait en français , si c'est possible
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astrig




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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeVen 11 Juil - 0:22

Je vais faire Mafilou djan. Wink Mais je n'ai pas décidé encore quand et comment. geek
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mafilou




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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeVen 11 Juil - 0:48

J'ai encore deux pages à ajouter, je vais essayer del e finir ce w.e.
En fait j'ai un problème et comme tu es keghatzi tu peux m'aider.
J'ai ce lien:
http://www.armeniabyphotos.com/displayimage.php?album=3&pos=361
Est-ce Kigi de dadjgastan ou il existe un autre Kigi en Hayastan?
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astrig




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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeVen 11 Juil - 1:58

Je voudrais mettre ce de votre lien aussi...

http://team-aow.discuforum.info/portal.php?pid=28
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astrig




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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeVen 11 Juil - 2:03

mafilou a écrit:
Est-ce Kigi de dadjgastan ou il existe un autre Kigi en Hayastan?

C'est une bonne questionne, c'est trop bête mais je n'avais pas pensé demander, je demanderai et je mettrai la réponse ici.

Envois moi un mp stp et dis moi comment je peux t'aider entant qu'une Keghetsi...
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mafilou




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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeVen 11 Juil - 5:32

Merci d'avance.
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Karin

Karin


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MessageSujet: Re: KEGHI (GEGHI)   KEGHI (GEGHI) Icon_minitimeDim 8 Mar - 21:23